Bourke Accounting likes women. Not in a creepy, hidden cameras in the bathroom kind of way. At Bourke Accounting, there are more female employees than male, but everyone is treated identically. If one of us messes up – no matter what gender – Boss Bill will call us to the carpet in the exact same fashion.

Bill doesn’t come down harder on us because we are women and he sure isn’t easier on us because we’re the gentler sex. Nope. He holds everyone to his same, exacting standard.

I like this. As a kid, I hated playing games with boys who “went easy” on me because I happened to be a girl. I also hated the boys who told me I couldn’t be on the team because, as a girl, I would only drag their side down. Since playing “Kill the Man” was a lot more fun than making squishy, light-bulb heated brownies with the Easy Bake Oven, I was often disappointed.

Long gone are the times when women couldn’t own property, vote or even serve on juries. While women might not enjoy 100% equality, we’re getting there. What I really think is interesting is that, throughout history, the simplest things lead to the biggest consequences.

Take, for example, Susanna M. Salter.

Susanna Salter was a very vocal member of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union in Kansas. When women were granted the right to vote and run in local elections in 1887, the WCTU decided to endorse male candidates who shared their hatred of alcohol. As a leader of the WCTU, Susanna Salter, “presided at [the] caucus” (Timeline.com) in which candidates were selected, including the position of mayor. Some of the men present were “offended by female presumption to endorse candidates” (Timeline.com) and thought they had come up with the perfect plan to humiliate these uppity, loud women.

Without her being aware of it, this group of men substituted Salter’s name on the ballot as their candidate for mayor. These guys “assumed that no man would vote for a woman mayor” (Timeline.com) and Salter’s loss would put her and her group back in their proper place. These sad little men hadn’t really thought this through, however – women had just won the right to vote and run in local elections, remember?

While doing laundry, Salter was made aware that her name was on the ballot and asked if she would serve if elected. A little confused, she said, “sure.” The members of the WCTU turned out to vote for their girl, while some men found the whole thing funny and voted for her, too (Timeline.com). So, because of a mean-spirited joke, Susanna M. Salter became the first female mayor in America.

While Salter chose not to run for a second term, her point was made. In addition, her contribution inspired other women. For example, in 1888, Mary Lowman ran in Oskaloosa, KS and “served with the nation’s first all-woman city council” (Timeline.com).

Equality for everyone is important. It might be slow going at times, but I think we’re becoming more enlightened every day.

Bourke Accounting bookkeepers and tax preparers are good with businesses. Bourke Accounting experts are good with tax returns. However, Bourke Accounting specialists aren’t good with discrimination. Your Bourke Accounting rep will provide the same wonderful guidance and service no matter what your gender might be. It’s too exhausting to be any other way.

Come see us any time. Our number is 502-451-8773 and don’t forget to visit our website at www.bourkeaccounting.com. See you soon!

Written by Sue H.